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    Gunscape

    How great is it when games release a level editor? Many players enjoy exploring and creating content, especially when tools are made as accessible as possible. Gunscape prioritises this process in a similar way to Minecraft or Adventure Construction Set (1984) in that making and sharing levels is as important (and fun) as playing, if not more so.


    Building blocks are thematically organised based on subgenres of first person shooters, from Doom-like collections to modern military titles. The learning curve isn’t entirely gentle, but it is easy enough to start manipulating pieces, envisioning and testing levels, through experimentation. You can also build co-operatively, which could become part of a challenge of your devising.

    Designers have kept play modes very flexible, necessarily. Objectives can range from capture the flag and multiplayer arenas to single player campaigns. Currently, finished levels uploaded to the community range from puzzle mazes to diverse worlds players could battle in strategically. After playing, you’re simply asked if you enjoyed it, which contributes to the level’s score.

    Designer and programmer, Glen Forrester, tells us, “I want people to channel their architectural mojo into level design, to create play experiences that’ll surprise us. That’s why the blocks are large and a big part of why we take so much inspiration from the golden age of purely abstract, gameplay-focused FPS levels.” Really, it’s true. The only thing better than playing against your friends is playing against them in a level you made, possibly together, after all.

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